November 2020: Stay Informed of the Latest HR News

02.11.20 03:33 PM By Forsite Benefits



Final Forms and Instructions for 2020 ACA Reporting Released

 

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released final 2020 forms and instructions for reporting under Internal Revenue Code (Code) Sections 6055 and 6056.

 

  • 2020 Form 1094-B and Form 1095-B (and related instructions) will be used by providers of minimum essential coverage (MEC), including self-insured plan sponsors that are not ALEs, to report under Section 6055.
  • 2020 Form 1094-C and Form 1095-C (and related instructions) will be used by applicable large employers (ALEs) to report under Section 6056, as well as for combined Section 6055 and 6056 reporting by ALEs who sponsor self-insured plans.


These forms and instructions include a number of changes and clarifications related to 2020 reporting.

 

  • The deadline for furnishing statements to individuals under Sections 6055 and 6056 has been extended to March 2, 2021.
  • Relief from penalties for reporting incorrect or incomplete information, and providing individual statements under Section 6055 only upon request, has been extended to 2020 reporting.
  • The “Plan Start Month” box is now required for 2020 reporting.


Changes were also made to Forms 1095-B and 1095-C related to offers of individual coverage health reimbursement arrangements (ICHRAs).

 

Employers should become familiar with these forms and instructions for reporting for the 2020 calendar year. Individual statements must be furnished by March 2, 2021, and IRS returns must be filed by Feb. 28, 2021 (March 31, 2021, if filed electronically).

 

Preventing Remote Work Time Theft

 

Time theft in the workplace is a common and expensive problem across industries. And, if not addressed, it can cost employers time, money and customers. In fact, the American Payroll Association found that 75% of businesses in the United States are affected by time theft every year. Another study estimates that time theft costs U.S. employers more than $400 billion per year in lost productivity.

 

When employees are working remotely, it’s harder to detect and prevent all types of fraud. Time theft leads to lower productivity, which in turn leads to financial losses for the organization. Fortunately, there are steps that organizations can take to mitigate the risk of workplace time theft. Consider the following strategies:

 

  • Establish rules and expectations—It’s critical to address time theft in company policies and clearly define behaviors and consequences. It’s best to measure performance on benchmarks, so ensure policies clarify what conduct is not acceptable.
  • Check in regularly—Managers should regularly check in with remote employees, asking what they’re working on and how they’re feeling. If there are already standing meetings on the calendar, managers should stick to them and use them as additional ways to check on how employees are doing.
  • Keep employees engaged—Support employees through both challenges and successes. It’s important to reward a job well done and recognize employees publicly. When employees feel appreciated, they are often more motivated and committed to working hard.
  • Provide productivity resources—Employers should consider offering virtual time-management training or workshops, or simply ask employees to informally share their favorite productivity hacks with coworkers.
  • Use tracking software, as needed—Depending on the nature of work, it might be appropriate to use time-tracking or monitoring software to keep tabs on employees.


Time theft is a nearly silent form of fraud that can happen to any organization. It’s important for employers to be aware of how it happens and take the necessary steps to prevent it, especially with remote workers. A combination of clear guidelines, tools and employee support can help companies lower their risk of time theft. Trust employees to do the right thing and keep them engaged to reduce the company’s overall risk.


OSHA Clarifies COVID-19 Reporting Requirements

 

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has published two additional answers to its list of COVID-19 frequently asked questions (FAQs). The new answers clarify when employers must report COVID-19 in-patient hospitalizations and fatalities.

 

Reporting Hospitalizations

OSHA requires employers to report in-patient hospitalizations only if the hospitalization occurs within 24 hours of an exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace. As a result, employers must report COVID-19 hospitalizations only if the hospitalizations are:

 

  • For in-patient treatment; and
  • The result of a work-related case of COVID-19.


The report must be submitted within 24 hours of the time the employer determines there was an in-patient hospitalization caused by a COVID-19 case. Hospitalization for diagnostic testing or observation only is not “in-patient” hospitalization.

 

Reporting Fatalities

OSHA requires employers to report fatalities that occur within 30 days of an exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace. Employers must submit fatality reports within eight hours of learning that the fatality took place and that it was due to a work-related exposure.

 

Recording Requirements

These FAQs address only reporting requirements for COVID-19. Employers can review their COVID-19 recording requirements on OSHA’s website.

 

Preventing Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Despite decades of attention in the media and courts, sexual harassment remains a significant and costly problem in today's business environment. Learn how to prevent sexual harassment in your workplace by watching this video >>>.


The content herein is provided for general information purposes only, and does not constitute legal, tax, or other advice or opinions on any matters. This information has been taken from sources which we believe to be reliable, but there is no guarantee as to its accuracy.

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